Berman & Simmons News Articles

  • Patient Safety News: Medical errors are third leading cause of death

    Medical errors are now the third-leading cause of death in the U.S., behind cancer and heart attacks, according to a study by Johns Hopkins University.An estimated 250,000 people die each year from medical errors, and others suffer debilitating injuries that can leave them out of work, in need of constant contact with medical professionals, and out of viable options to feel well again.This article discusses the wide variety of issues comprised by the term medical errors, and highlights a Portland Press Herald piece interviewing Dr. Dora Anne Mills, the vice president of clinical affairs at the University of New England.If you have been harmed by medical malpractice due to a medical error, contact Berman & Simmons for a free consultation.

  • Patient Safety News: Diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of heart failure

    Type II diabetes medications containing saxagliptin has been linked to an increased risk of heart failure, according to an April 2016 report released by the FDA.The safety review determined that patients using Onglyza (saxagliptin) and Kombiglyze XR (saxagliptin and metformin extended release) may have an increased risk of heart failure, especially if patients have existing heart or kidney diseases. Some patients receiving drugs containing saxagliptin were hospitalized for heart failure.Healthcare professionals and patients should report any adverse side effects related to the medications to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to help clients who have taken any of these medications and suffered damages.

  • Patient Safety News: Power morcellator worsened prognosis for women

    The power morcellator was used during gynecological surgery to cut up uterine fibroids—until the FDA reported that it can spread cancerous tissue throughout the abdomen.According to The Wall Street Journal, about 70 of the estimated 100 claims filed against Johnson & Johnson for their morcellator (which came off the market in July 2014) were settled recently, with settlements ranging from $100,000 to $1 million.This article describes cautions about the device, as well as its continued sale and marketing by other manufacturers.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving women who were diagnosed with cancer after surgery involving morcellation.

  • Patient Safety News: Bair Hugger blanket allegedly led to amputation

    More lawsuits have been filed against 3M for its Bair Hugger blanket devices, used by hospitals since the 1980s to keep patients warm in surgery involving anesthesia.According to the Louisiana Record, Lee Edward Peyton of New Orleans claimed the Bair Hugger system led to a hospital-acquired infection and ultimately the amputation of his left leg.This article highlights Peytons case, one of many Bair Hugger lawsuits filed nationwide, alleging its manufacturers were aware of the risks of hospital-acquired infections but did not warn patients or the medical community.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving patients who developed serious infections after surgeries in which Bair Hugger and other forced-air heating systems were used.

  • Patient Safety News: Makers of Xarelto misled medical journal, NYT reports

    The makers of the anti-clotting medication Xarelto were cited for allegedly misleading the editors of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) by failing to include critical laboratory data. Concerns about this letter are deeply troubling for consumers who deserve transparency and full disclosure from drug makers.This article highlights a New York Times piece that raises new questions about the FDA approval process for Xarelto in 2011. The drug was approved after a fast-track regulatory review, despite the fact that some of the agency’s own scientists had concerns about its safety.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving clients who took Xarelto and suffered harm.

  • Patient safety news: $72M jury verdict links talcum powder with cancer

    The use of baby powder has been linked to cancer, as a jury in St. Louis awarded $72 million to the estate of a woman who died of ovarian cancer in 2015.Lawyers had alleged that use of manufacturer Johnson & Johnsons powder products over a 30-year period had caused inflammation and cancer to their clients ovaries. They claimed the manufacturer knew about a correlation between talcum powder and cancer, but did nothing to alert the public to potential health risks.This article details results of the lawsuit, and offers links to more information.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving women who developed ovarian cancer after use of products containing talc.

  • Patient Safety News: IVC filter maker knew about risks, failed to act, report says

    Serious questions have been raised about why the manufacturer of a popular blood-clot filter did not remove its dangerous product from the marketplace.According NBC, manufacturer C.R. Bard knew about safety risks with its G2 series IVC filters around the time of their FDA approval in 2005 but continued to market them until 2010. The filters have since been linked to at least 12 deaths and hundreds of injuries.This article gives more information about NBCs reporting.Berman & Simmons attorney Michael Bigos is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving patients who developed harmful complications due to the use of G2 and other types of IVC filters.

  • Patient Safety News: One doctors fight against power morcellation

    Married doctors in Philadelphia recently shared their intensely personal story about fighting cancer, which they believe was spread by a power morcellator, a device that until recently had been commonly used during gynecological surgeries.This article highlights Dr. Amy Reed and her husband, as reported in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Reed was diagnosed with leiomyosarcoma cancer in 2013 after what was planned to be a routine hysterectomy. The post includes a video and more information.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving women diagnosed with cancer after a gynecological surgery involving morcellation.

  • Patient Safety News: Zofran linked to congenital heart defect

    The anti-nausea drug Zofran continues to be in the public spotlight because of claims that it can cause birth defects, including cleft lip and palate, if used by expecting mothers.The controversy was the focus of a report recently by the Fox TV affiliate in Boston, where many Zofran lawsuits have been consolidated in federal court against drug maker GlaxoSmithKline. This article links to media coverage about Beth Botelho, who used Zofran during pregnancy, and her daughter Marissa, who was born needing heart surgery.Berman & Simmons attorney Susan Faunce is working in collaboration with other national law firms to handle legal claims involving women who took Zofran and whose unborn children suffered injuries or birth defects.

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